Munich Security Report 2017

Reports

ATLANTIC COUNCIL: Global Risks 2035 

The Search for a New Normal 

Determining a breakdown of the post-Cold War security order, Matthew J. Burrows’s insightful report discusses what the international order might look like roughly 20 years from now; thought-provoking if dire scenarios range from a “fragmented world” to a new Cold War.1 

THE BROOKINGS INSTITUTION: China’s Global Rise: 

Can the EU and U.S. Pursue a Coordinated Strategy? 

China’s current economic transition poses a significant challenge for policy-makers in the US and the EU. The authors argue that a coordinated approach by the US and the EU is necessary in order to ensure China’s compliance with the rules of global economic governance.2

CENTER FOR STRATEGIC AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES: The Kremlin Playbook 

Understanding Russian Influence in Central and Eastern Europe 

Calling on the international community to “collectively recognize that Russian influence is not just a domestic governance challenge but a national security threat,” CSIS analysts take a close look at Russia’s manifold external networks and activities in its neighborhood.3 

EUROPEAN COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS: Heavy Metal Diplomacy 

Russia’s Political Use of Its Military in Europe Since 2014 

The use of military power for coercive diplomacy has characterized Russia’s recent foreign policy toward the West, Mark Galeotti argues in this report. In doing so, “Four Ds” have been at the center of Russian strategy: Divide, Distract, Dismay, and Dominate.

THE GERMAN MARSHALL FUND OF THE UNITED STATES/OCP POLICY CENTER: Atlantic Currents 2016 

An Annual Report on Wider Atlantic Perspectives and Patterns 

Analyzing issues ranging from climate-resilient development, the EU Global Strategy’s potential impact on Africa to cooperation against transnational crime, GMF and OCP provide a multifaceted collection of impulses for Atlantic dialogue.5 

GLOBAL COMMISSION ON INTERNET GOVERNANCE: Final Report 

A two-year initiative led by the Centre for International Governance Innovation and Chatham House, the Global Commission on Internet Governance consists of 29 commisioners and 39 research advisors who in this report adress key issues in Internet Governance, ranging from cybersecurity to digital privacy, surveillance and the protection of human rights online.6 

INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE OF THE RED CROSS: People on War 

Perspectives from 16 Countries

2016 saw a dismaying number of violations of the laws of war, including, but not limited to, targeted attacks on civilians, humanitarian personnel, and medical facilities. In this report, the ICRC combines striking findings from a large-scale survey with calls for action.7

INTERNATIONAL CRISIS GROUP: Seizing the Moment

From Early Warning to Early Action

Recent crises, rivalries, and conflicts have shown the short-comings of preventative diplomacy. Yet, diplomacy can be revived – the authors propose a strategic framework addressing both internal and external dimensions of recent conflicts, based on a thorough analysis of conflict drivers.8

MCKINSEY GLOBAL INSTITUTE: People on the Move Global Migration's Impact and Opportunity

Across societies, heated debate around migration shaped the political discourse over the past year. Yet a central fact is largely ignored: as this McKinsey report shows, migration generates significant economic benefits, which can be further increased through better integration of immigrants.9

NUCLEAR THREAT INITIATIVE: Rising Nuclear Dangers 

Steps to Reduce Risks in the Euro-Atlantic Region

Based on a survey of leading security experts, this report proposes several measures to avoid miscalculation and escalation. The authors call on Western and Russian leaders to initiate a dialogue on strategic stability and nuclear risk reduction.10

STOCKHOLM INTERNATIONAL PEACE RESEARCH INSTITUTE: Climate-Related Security Risks 

Towards an Integrated Approach

This comprehensive report lays out the far-reaching security implications of climate change. It analyzes both risks in six thematic areas as well as current responses by different policy communities – foreign affairs, defense, environmental, and development.11

UNITED STATES INSTITUTE OF PEACE/WILSON CENTER: The Jihadi Threat

ISIS, Al-Qaeda, and Beyond

What are the key drivers of jihadism? How will terrorist groups change in the near future? In this volume, 20 leading scholars on the Middle East, Islamic extremism, and jihadism share their assessments of one of the most pressing and complex security challenges of our time.12

Footnotes

  1. The Atlantic Council of the United States, “Global Risks 2035: The Search for a New Normal,” September 2016. 
  2. The Brookings Institution, “China’s Global Rise: Can the EU and U.S. Pursue a Coordinated Strategy?,” October 2016. 
  3. Center for Strategic and International Studies, “The Kremlin Playbook: Understanding Russian Influence in Central and Eastern Europe,” October 2016. 
  4. European Council on Foreign Relations, “Heavy Metal Diplomacy: Russia’s Political Use of its Military in Europe since 2014,” December 2016. 
  5. The German Marshall Fund of the United States/OCP Policy Center, “Atlantic Currents 2016: An Annual Report on Wider Atlantic Perspectives and Patterns,” December 2016. 
  6. Global Commission on Internet Governance, “One Internet,” 2016. 
  7. International Committee of the Red Cross, “People on War: Perspectives From 16 Countries,” December 2016. 
  8. International Crisis Group, “Seizing the Moment: From Early Warning to Early Action,” June 2016. 
  9. McKinsey Global Institute, “People on the Move: Global Migration's Impact and Opportunity,” November 2016. 
  10. Nuclear Threat Initiative, “Rising Nuclear Dangers: Steps to Reduce Risks in the Euro-Atlantic Region,” December 2016. 
  11. Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, “Climate-Related Security Risks: Towards an Integrated Approach,” October 2016. 
  12. Wilson Center and United States Institute of Peace, “The Jihadi Threat: ISIS, Al-Qaeda, and Beyond,” December 2016.